Chinese Golden Thread Turtle

Chinese Golden Thread Turtle
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  • Item #: CGT
 
Scientific Name:  Ocadia sinensis

Identification:  Upon hatching, this turtle’s shell bears a moderate medial keel and weak-to-moderate lateral keels. The tail of hatchlings is remarkably long. The carapace’s surface texture is rather granular, but this gradually subsides with growth and their muddy brown shell is also highlighted around the edges. The turtle’s pattern consists of numerous bright yellow stripes contrasted with darker stripes (ranging from green to brown to black) on the face, neck and limbs
                                                  
Range:  Ocadia sinensis lives in slow-moving lowland ponds, marshes, and streams in southern China, Taiwan, north and central Vietnam and Laos.

Diet: True omnivores, Chinese Golden Thread Turtles eat a variety of aquatic plants, and some insects and fish. They readily take pellets, super worms, cut fish, earth worms and romaine lettuce. Most golden turtles are not choosey and gobble everything with equal delight.

The Chinese Golden Thread Turtles are the most popular pet turtle sold in Asia and their popularity in North America and Europe is rapidly increasing.  The beautiful Chinese Striped-neck or Golden Thread turtle is often overlooked as a possible addition to a collection. This is a shame as they are very unique looking and interesting to keep.  The Chinese Golden Thread Turtles are the most popular pet turtle sold in Asia and their popularity in North America and Europe is rapidly increasing.  The beautiful Chinese Striped-neck or Golden Thread turtle is often overlooked as a possible addition to a collection. This is a shame as they are very unique looking and interesting to keep.  
Ocadia sinensis is found in sub-tropical to tropical climates and does not hibernate and therefore, is probably not the best choice for year-around outdoor enclosures in colder climates. The Ocadia Sinensis are a greedy lot and become excited at the sight of food. They would swim to the surface and greet the owner excitedly. At times they are so excited they might bite fingers accidentally. Its muscular limbs and fully webbed feet make it a strong and able swimmer, even in rivers with moderate currents.
Listed as Endangered on the World Conservation Union’s Red List of Threatened Species, O. sinensis faces a very high risk of extinction in the near future. Human activity presents the primary threat within its native range.
 

 

 

 

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Price $39.00

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