Red Ear Slider

Red Ear Slider
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  • Item #: RES

Scientific Name: Trachemys scripta elegans

NO FLORIDA SALES

Identification:  The carapace is oval and flattened (especially in the male) and has a weak keel that is more pronounced in the young. The color of the carapace changes depending on the age of the turtle. In young or recently born turtles, it is leaf green and gets slightly darker as a turtle gets older until it is a very dark green and then turns a shade between brown and olive green. The plastron is always a light yellow with dark, paired, irregular markings in the centre of most scutes. The plastron is highly variable in pattern. The head, legs, and tail are green with fine, yellow, irregular lines. They typically have a jelly bean-like long, horizontally-placed red patch directly behind the eye (hence the name). The whole shell is covered in stripes and marks that aid in camouflaging an individual.

Range: Native Range: The Red-eared Slider's indigenous range broadly covers the midwestern states and extending as far east as West Virginia and a disjunct (relict) population in southern Ohio, as far west as eastern New Mexico, and as far south as south of the Rio Grande River into northeastern Mexico

Throughout its nonindigenous range T. scripta is introduced primarily through pet releases and escapes; a situation which has continued for several decades since the 1930s, reaching a peak during the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle television cartoon craze of the late 1980s-early 1990s

Diet: Adult turtles tend to be more herbivorous than juveniles, but both will opportunistically eat aquatic invertebrates (especially insects and mollusks), fish, frog eggs and tadpoles, aquatic snakes, and a wide variety of aquatic plants and algae. In captivity they do well on ReptoMin and Mazuri.

Red-eared sliders can be quite aggressive—especially when food is involved. Behavior is usually noted to become this way when fed live food. If being kept as a pet, care must be taken to prevent injury or even death of smaller tank mates.

It is now illegal in Florida to sell any wild-type red-eared slider, as they interbreed with the local yellow-bellied slider population . However, unusual color varieties such as albino and pastel red-eared sliders, which are derived from captive breeding, are still allowed for sale. Owing to their popularity as pets, red-eared sliders have been released or escaped into the wild in many parts of the world. Feral populations of red-eared sliders are now found in Australia, Europe, South Africa, the Caribbean, Israel, Bahrain Mariana Islands, Guam, and south east and far east Asia. In Australia, it is illegal for members of the public to import, keep, trade, or release red-eared sliders, as they are regarded as an invasive species. Their import has been banned by the European Union and specific member countries. Invasive red-eared sliders cause negative impacts in the ecosystems they occupy because they have certain advantages over the native populations, such as a lower age at maturity, higher fecundity rates, and larger body size, which gives them a competitive advantage at basking and nesting sites, as well as when exploiting food resources.

Price $20.00
Availability Out-of-Stock

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